There Is No Place Like Home

IMG_20150226_133402793_HDRHome. A word that brings up not only images but feelings. Dorothy said it best.There is no place like home.

Working with rescue and shelter animals, I have seen many homeless first hand.Those animals who have lost their families due to no fault of their own. Or perhaps they have never had a real home. A kennel is not a home; it is just a container filled with a life wanting to be seen, understood and given a second chance.To be truly seen, loved and homed; that is what all beings crave and deserve that. I am forever grateful to all the wonderful rescues and sanctuaries that have gone out of their way to help these animals feel the warmth of a real home and finally be seen.

Daily, from the comfort of my car or from a warm building in the city, I see lots of other homeless.These homeless are people.They are everywhere, and are unseen also.They have fallen through the social cracks, down on their luck, or maybe they were once one of us. Maybe once they had a home, and like my husband, who was within a hairs’ breath of not having a job a few years ago before he got rehired, but they found no job and now are homeless. Maybe a serious health problem stripped them of all their savings and home. Maybe they were a veteran, who came back from war and could not find a job to fit their skills, or maybe that veteran has suffered mental illness or physical disability from the time served and was not capable of taking on a job. Maybe it was a mother and kids that are escaping domestic abuse, trading in the lesser of the evils; living on the street instead of with her abuser. There are so many ways, that in an instant, we all can be homeless. I see them as courageous and strong, and I wonder just how long I would go without my home without all its trappings of my own bed, clothes, internet, TV, food, heat, cell phone, etc. without wanting to jump off a bridge. Yet these homeless people do it daily. How humbling and horrifying it must be to have to rely on us and the system for their survival or escape from homelessness. They are still one of us, and it would be good for us to consider seeing ourselves in them.

Have you ever tried to support yourself, let alone, a family on minimum wage? I have a son in Portland Me that has a great work ethic and a good part time job, but only receives minimum wage. He is in line for full time; he has been in that line for the past several years, but it looks like someone has to quit or die before he can move up. So he stays, waiting and worrying that he gets enough work so that he can continue to wait. He lives in a one room studio in the YMCA and he is one of the lucky ones; at least he has a roof over his head and heat during the winter, but he is always just hours away from being on the street.There are many weeks he does not get enough hours at work to eat, pay his rent and get bus fare to work; somehow he gets by until the better weeks roll in.

I wonder how we got to this point of a throwaway society. We throw away pets, animals, and other people. How can we, as a society, turn a blind eye to homeless beings of any species, and how can we deny it? Why we are unable to see the unseen hundreds that are right under our nose. Why their lives do not matter as we scurry about in ours. I wonder if it is fear. Fear that it could happen to us, so if we close our eyes it will not be present with us? Or are we afraid of them; that they may rob us or do us some harm? I think that maybe we fear looking at ourselves; they make us question who we are and what we stand for. What would we have to do to become the person that we would like to be. We are only as good as the weakest member of our society and we are failing. Mother Theresa states that one of the greatest diseases is to be NOBODY to anybody. And yet that disease is all around us. I can see it in myself as I try not to make eye contact.

We may not have all the answers or be able to solve all the problems associated with homelessness, but each one of us can probably do something, albeit a small thing, whether it be animal or people related. Perhaps changing our viewpoint would be a great start and then some hows may show up.

On a brighter note, I did read somewhere in Utah, they are making tiny homes for the homeless to live in that was actually proving to be more cost effective than having homeless people on the street. Then, more impressively, I read about a college student that had built some tiny homes from donations and sponsors that she is going to donate to the homeless in TX. The first home she built she named Ruby from the ruby slippers in the Wizard of OZ, hoping for it to be a catalyst for many families to get back on their feet. After all, there is no place like home.

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